Burnt ends, those wonderfully delectable morsels of goodness that are browned perfectly on the outside and soft and moist on the inside are often made from the fatty end of the brisket called the point but I discovered a good while back that they can also be made from pork in much the same way.

In the past I have cooked a whole pork butt to about 170°F then cubed it up for pork burnt ends. In this recipe, I found some pork country style ribs on sale and used those instead. A much shorter process with all of the wonderful deliciousness makes these a win-win situation.

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Helpful Information
  • Preparation time: 15 minutes
  • Cook time: 5-6 hours
  • Smoker temperature: 225-240°F
  • Meat finish temperature: 185°F
  • Recommended wood: Pecan
What You'll Need

*Most country style ribs are cut from pork butt but I have seen it cut from pork loin and other leaner cuts of meat. Ask the butcher to make sure it is cut from pork butt before purchasing.

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Get the Recipes for Jeff’s Rub and Sauce


recipe-ad-rub

Please don't use that extra salty, chemical ridden excuse for a rub that you often find in the spice aisle of the grocery store on these.. it won't taste very good and then you'll blame me and it will just be a big hot mess.

My rub recipe is absolutely perfect on these burnt ends along with my barbecue sauce recipe to make these something to rave about. You will thank me later!

promise you’ll love my dry rub/seasoning recipe and my barbecue sauce recipe or you don’t pay!

Reasons to buy: Support the newsletter and the website | Own “the recipes” | Get the email newsletter 100% AD FREE from now on | Includes the Texas style rub recipe

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Step 1: Cut Pork into Cubes

Ok, they don't actually have to be perfect cubes. Pieces, whether square or oblong that are about 1 inch wide will work perfectly.

IMG_8646-250x167 IMG_8647-250x167

Step 2: Add Rub

There's two ways you can go about adding the rub:

Bag Method (best if you want to season them the night before)

  1. Place all of the pieces into a bag
  2. Add 2-3 TBS of vegetable oil and ¼ cup of rub to the bag
  3. Seal bag and shake, roll, massage bag to coat the pieces of meat
  4. Place in fridge until ready to use

Fast Method (the method I used)

Place the meat onto a cooling rack or Bradley rack in a single layer making sure to leave a little space between each one so the smoke and heat can get to them.

IMG_8649-250x167

Spray top and sides with vegetable oil

Sprinkle Jeff's original rub (purchase recipes here) onto meat

IMG_8650-250x167 IMG_8652-250x167

Step 3: Smoke Cook the Meat to About 160°F 

If you used the bag method, remove the meat from the fridge and place the pieces onto a cooling rack or Bradley rack in a single layer making sure to leave a little space between each one so the smoke and heat can get to them.

Setup your smoker for cooking at about 225°F with pecan smoke or other favorite smoking wood.

If your smoker has a water pan, use it.

Once the smoker is ready, place the racks of meat into the smoker and let them cook until they reach about 160°F.

This will take 3-4 hours depending on how cold the meat is when it goes in and how well the smoker maintains the goal temperature.

During this time, the most important thing is the smoke flavor so keep a light smoke going constantly.

IMG_8655-250x167

Step 4: Into a Foil Pan with Sauce and More Rub

When the meat reaches about 160°F it is time to start creating the delicious bark on the outside of the pork burnt ends.

Place all of the pieces of meat into foil pans.

Keep it to a single layer rather than piling it on top of each other. You may need to use multiple pans.

IMG_8657-250x167

Add sauce to the top of the meat and stir it around. This is for flavor, bark creation and to help the rub to stick.

IMG_8661-250x167

Sprinkle my rub (purchase recipes here) generously to the top of the meat and once again stir the meat to coat well.

IMG_8664-250x167

What's up with the Mustard Sauce in the pictures?

I have had a few people over the years and very recently tell me that they used mustard instead of ketchup in my barbecue sauce recipe (purchase recipes here). I decided to try it on these and while I may tweak it some before releasing it officially, it was very, very good and I don't think you'll be disappointed if you decide to try it.

I tried it on half of the pork burnt ends so I could compare it to my tomato based barbecue sauce.

I still think I like the tomato based better on the pork burnt ends but both were very good and it was a very high bar to raise.

To make the mustard sauce once you have ordered my barbecue sauce recipe (purchase recipes here), simply replace the ketchup with mustard and add about ¼ cup honey to cut the “tang” a little.

Step 5: Cook Until Tender or about 185°F 

Place the pans of meat into the smoker and continue to keep the smoke and heat going as before for 1-2 more hours.

If you have a smoker that is capable of higher temperatures, bark can be best achieved at 275°F or even higher. The grill will also work for this.

The meat will need to be stirred every 30 minutes or so. More often at higher temperatures.

When the meat reaches 185°F and has a nice bark formation all over, it is done and ready to eat.

IMG_8667-250x167

Step 6: Serve as Appetizer or Entree

Burnt ends are great appetizers eaten with a toothpick or a pile of burnt ends next to mashed potatoes and barbecue beans is a real crowd pleaser.

IMG_8676-250x167

If you want to see a couple of other pork burnt end recipes, check out the following links:

Special Tips and Comments

How to monitor temperature when it's cold outside or you just don't want to get out of your chair

Use a remote digital probe meat thermometer such as the Maverick ET-733 to monitor the temperature while it cooks. The sending unit stays with the smoker and has room for 2 probes. The receiver goes in your pocket, on your belt or on your bedside table so you'll always know what's going on at the smoker. This thing saves me a lot of time and unnecessary walking.

A Thermapen is also a great tool to have in your pocket for making quick checks or for when you need to check multiple items very quickly. This thermometer reads in about 2-3 seconds (it's fast) and the newest model is waterproof, orients the readout based on how you are holding it and automatically awakes when you pick it up. Very nice indeed and Christmas is just around the corner. Now is the time to ask for it 😉

How about cooking the pork country style ribs whole then cutting them up at 160-170°F ?

This can definitely be done with great results and is how I did it the previous time. Cutting them up first is my attempt for more smoke flavor in each piece and to try and get them done just a little faster. Do what is convenient for you and it will still be great.

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***Note: you get the Texas style rub recipe free with your order!

If I could give these recipes away, I would do that. I really want you to have them! But, then, this is how I support the newsletter, the website and all of the other stuff that we do here to promote the art of smoking meat.

Read these recent testimonies:

"Love the sauce and rub recipes. So far I have used them on beef ribs, pork ribs, and different chicken parts. Can't wait to do a beef brisket. Texas rub is great as well!" ~Peter S.
"I tried the rub on a beef brisket and some beef ribs the other day and our entire family enjoyed it tremendously. I also made a batch of the barbeque sauce that we used on the brisket as well as some chicken. We all agreed it was the best sauce we have had in a while." ~Darwyn B.
"Love the original rib rub and sauce! We have an annual rib fest competition at the lake every 4th of July. I will say we have won a great percent of the time over the past 15 years so we are not novices by any means. However, we didn't win last year and had to step up our game! We used Jeff's rub and sauce (sauce on the side) and it was a landslide win for us this year! Thanks Jeff for the great recipes. I'm looking forward to trying the Texas style rub in the near future!" ~Michelle M.

You see the raving testimonies and you wonder, "Can the recipes really be that good?"

No worries! Make up a batch and if it's not as good as you've heard.. simply ask for a refund. Now that's a bargain and you know it. Let's review:

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smoking-meat-book-cover-275x289The book is full of recipes and contains tons of helpful information as well. Some have even said that "no smoker should be without this book"!

With more than 800 reviews on Amazon.com and a rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars, it comes highly recommended.

It is a Bestseller in Barbecueing & Grilling books on Amazon.

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Printable Recipe

4.5 from 2 reviews
Pork Country Style Rib Burnt Ends
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Burnt ends, those wonderfully delectable morsels of goodness that are browned perfectly on the outside and soft and moist on the inside are often made from the fatty end of the brisket called the point but I discovered a good while back that they can also be made from pork in much the same way.
Author:
Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: Hot Smoking
Serves: 6-8
Ingredients
Instructions
Step 1: Cut Pork into Cubes
  1. Ok, they don't actually have to be perfect cubes. Pieces, whether square or oblong that are about 1 inch wide will work perfectly.
Step 2: Add Rub
  1. There's two ways you can go about adding the rub:
  2. Bag Method (best if you want to season them the night before)
  3. Place all of the pieces into a bag
  4. Add 2-3 TBS of vegetable oil and ¼ cup of rub to the bag
  5. Seal bag and shake, roll, massage bag to coat the pieces of meat
  6. Place in fridge until ready to use
  7. Fast Method (the method I used)
  8. Place the meat onto a cooling rack or Bradley rack in a single layer making sure to leave a little space between each one so the smoke and heat can get to them.
  9. Spray top and sides with vegetable oil
  10. Sprinkle Jeff's original rub onto meat
Step 3: Smoke Cook the Meat to About 160°F
  1. If you used the bag method, remove the meat from the fridge and place the pieces onto a cooling rack or Bradley rack in a single layer making sure to leave a little space between each one so the smoke and heat can get to them.
  2. Setup your smoker for cooking at about 225°F with pecan smoke or other favorite smoking wood.
  3. If your smoker has a water pan, use it.
  4. Once the smoker is ready, place the racks of meat into the smoker and let them cook until they reach about 160°F.
  5. This will take 3-4 hours depending on how cold the meat is when it goes in and how well the smoker maintains the goal temperature.
  6. During this time, the most important thing is the smoke flavor so keep a light smoke going constantly.
Step 4: Into a Foil Pan with Sauce and More Rub
  1. When the meat reaches about 160°F it is time to start creating the delicious bark on the outside of the pork burnt ends.
  2. Place all of the pieces of meat into foil pans.
  3. Keep it to a single layer rather than piling it on top of each other. You may need to use multiple pans.
  4. Add sauce to the top of the meat and stir it around. This is for flavor, bark creation and to help the rub to stick.
  5. Sprinkle my rub generously to the top of the meat and once again stir the meat to coat well.
Step 5: Cook Until Tender or about 185°F
  1. Place the pans of meat into the smoker and continue to keep the smoke and heat going as before for 1-2 more hours.
  2. If you have a smoker that is capable of higher temperatures, bark can be best achieved at 275°F or even higher. The grill will also work for this.
  3. The meat will need to be stirred every 30 minutes or so. More often at higher temperatures.
  4. When the meat reaches 185°F and has a nice bark formation all over, it is done and ready to eat.
Step 6: Serve as Appetizer or Entree
  1. Burnt ends are great appetizers eaten with a toothpick or a pile of burnt ends next to mashed potatoes and barbecue beans is a real crowd pleaser.
 

About the Author

Long time Industrial Engineer turned self-proclaimed fire poker, pitmaster and smoke whisperer and loving every minute of it!

6 Comments on this article. Feel free to join this conversation.

  1. Kevin Denny July 8, 2017 at 6:01 pm - Reply

    I’m trying to make this but I can’t get the printable recipe to work on any of my devices. It’s just blank on the preview. I love your recipes and your rub! ( I’ve never made the sauce.) Thanks Kevin.

    • Jeff Phillips July 11, 2017 at 10:12 am - Reply

      Kevin, I am unable to reproduce this problem. Were you able to finally get this to work for you?

  2. Bruce February 6, 2016 at 10:24 am - Reply

    Any reason why this wouldn’t also work by cubing a small uncooked butt? I see in other recipes that you recommend smoking the butt whole. In the essence of time, could a cubed butt be used if country style ribs are unavailable?

  3. Bruce Archer January 12, 2016 at 12:28 pm - Reply

    Jeff can I use these in competition for pork burnt ends….hmm sounds good

  4. Jeff December 4, 2015 at 7:40 am - Reply

    I have never been more excited to try one of your recipes… And I’ve tried a lot of them. Bit sized boneless ribs? Nothing wrong with that.

  5. Bob December 3, 2015 at 7:29 pm - Reply

    I do a variation on this recipe, and it is well received…often with the comment that it is “meat candy”.

    One really yummy thing to do is to take the leftovers (or make enough to accommodate the use) – and use it in a smoked pork chili.

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