Smoked pork country style ribs are usually cut from the pork butt and since they can get done in about 4 hours, they are a great option when you are trying to get food on the table in a relatively short period of time. You can put these on just after lunch and they'll be ready for dinner.

Helpful Information
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 4 hours
  • Smoker Temp: 225-240°F
  • Meat Finish Temp: 185°F
  • Recommended Wood: Mesquite + Cherry
What You'll Need

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recipe-ad-rubAs you may know, all pork is amazing with my rub on it and country style ribs are beyond amazing with my rub as the seasoning and flavorful crust.

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About Pork Country Style Ribs

Pork country style ribs are usually cut from the pork butt which has a lot of fat marbling and connective tissue. This means they need to be cooked  way above their safe temperature of 145°F in order to get them tender, and because they have fat to render, this is fine.

Sometimes you will find them cut from pork loin which is lean, not a lot of fat or connective tissue and anything above their safe temperature of 145°F is just going to dry them out and render them inedible.

The problem is that they are not always labeled properly so spend some time looking at a pork butt and a pork loin and you will be able to see the differences in the texture and how the meat looks. You can also ask the butcher or meat person behind the counter and hopefully they will know how the CSR's were cut.

If you can't be sure, then just purchase a whole pork butt and ask the butcher to debone and slice it into strips about 1 to 1.5 inches thick and 2-3 inches wide the length of the pork butt. Worse case scenario, get a sharp knife and debone/slice a pork butt yourself.

Step 1: Rinse and Pat Dry

Remove the country style ribs from the package and rinse them under cold water.

Pat them dry with a paper towel and lay them on the cutting board or in a large pan to contain the mess you'll make by seasoning them 😉

2015-IMG_7293

Step 2: Mustard and Rub

It's pork.. very good pork, I might add and as most of you know, that calls for a nice sticky base of yellow mustard to help the rub to stick to the meat.

Go ahead and be generous.. it won't taste like mustard and it won't be yellow when it's all said and done.

Tip: Some alternatives to regular yellow mustard are spicy brown mustard, olive oil or even my barbecue sauce.. all of these work just as well as yellow mustard and gives you some different flavor options.

2015-IMG_7294

Rub it all over with you hands or if don't want to get your hands into it, you can use a basting brush.

As long as the mustard is completely covering the meat, doesn't matter how it gets there (within reason of course).

2015-IMG_7295

Sprinkle my Jeff's original rub (purchase recipes here) onto the meat and make sure you have full coverage on all sides.

2015-IMG_7296

I like to rub it in a little so it turns into a paste with the mustard.

2015-IMG_7297

Step 3: Put the Meat On Racks (optional)

If you have Bradley racks like I do, lay them on the rack with just a slight bit of space between each one to allow the smoke to get in there a little bit.

You can also use Weber grill pans or even just ordinary cooling racks if you want.

I usually leave as much room as possible but I had other things to cook and so I had to give them a little less breathing room than usual.

2015-IMG_7300

Step 4: Get the Smoker Ready

Light up your smoker whether that means actually lighting the fire or just plugging it in and dialing in some settings. Do what it takes to get your smoker going at about 225°F.

Make sure the heat is indirect and use the water pan if your smoker has one.

I recommend cherry wood for smoke if you can find it. If not, just use one of your other favorites that you have available.


I enjoy using a Camp Chef pellet grill called the Woodwind for many of my recipes but there are some tricks to getting a good smoke flavor using this type of unit. To maximize the smoke flavor just set it to “Lo Smoke” for about an hour, which will give you a ton of smoke and then turn it up to “Hi Smoke” to finish, which still gives you quite a bit of smoke. Camp Chef has engineered their smokers to give the most smoke in these (2) special settings at the expense of holding a steady temperature.

The temperature will swing 15-25 degrees above and below your set temperature giving you an average smoking temperature. Don't get hung up on the swings and you'll find that the food turns out amazing with lots of smoke flavor.

Check out this awesome cooker HERE


Step 5: Smoke 'em Up

Once the smoker is ready, place the pork country style ribs directly on the grate or use the Bradley rack (described above) directly on the smoker grate.

Keep the heat at about 225°F if possible.

Keep the smoke going for at least 2 hours but longer is fine and even recommended as long as the smoke is nice and thin.

If you have a digital meat thermometer such as the “Smoke” by Thermoworks, place the probe so that the end is about in the center of one of the ribs.

You can also use the super-fast Thermapen to get a quick check on the temperature when you are adding wood or some other task that requires you to have the door open.

You can expect these ribs to take about 4 hours if you maintain 225-240°F but other factors do play a part such as:

  • Temperature of the meat when it goes into the smoker
  • How often you open the smoker door
  • How well you or the smoker maintains the set temperature
  • Wind, rain, ambient temperature, etc.

When the meat gets about 30 minutes away from being done, you can sauce them up if you want. I like sauce on these but they are also very good with just the dry rub.

Another option is to put them into a foil pan, covered with foil once they reach about 150-160°F to help them get done faster and to help them end up more tender.

Smoked country style ribs are perfectly done and tender at about 180-185°F.

Step 6: Rest and Serve

You do not have to let these rest for a few minutes but in my opinion, about 10 minutes of rest time before serving does them some good.

2015-IMG_7407

Serve them whole.. no need to slice or cut unless you are portioning for smaller eaters.

Enjoy!

2015-IMG_7408

Please note that my rubs and barbecue sauce are now available in 2 formats-- you can purchase the formulas and make them yourself OR you can buy them already made, in a bottle, ready to use.
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"Love the sauce and rub recipes. So far I have used them on beef ribs, pork ribs, and different chicken parts. Can't wait to do a beef brisket. Texas rub is great as well!" ~Peter S.
"I tried the rub on a beef brisket and some beef ribs the other day and our entire family enjoyed it tremendously. I also made a batch of the barbeque sauce that we used on the brisket as well as some chicken. We all agreed it was the best sauce we have had in a while." ~Darwyn B.
"Love the original rib rub and sauce! We have an annual rib fest competition at the lake every 4th of July. I will say we have won a great percent of the time over the past 15 years so we are not novices by any means. However, we didn't win last year and had to step up our game! We used Jeff's rub and sauce (sauce on the side) and it was a landslide win for us this year! Thanks Jeff for the great recipes. I'm looking forward to trying the Texas style rub in the near future!" ~Michelle M.

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Printable Recipe

Print Recipe
5 from 1 vote

Smoked Pork Country Style Ribs

Smoked pork country style ribs are usually cut from the pork butt and since they can get done in about 4 hours, they are a great option when you are trying to get food on the table in a relatively short period of time. You can put these on just after lunch and they’ll be ready for dinner.
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time4 hrs
Course: Entree
Cuisine: Hot Smoking
Servings: 6
Author: Jeff Phillips

Ingredients

Instructions

Step 1: Rinse and Pat Dry

  • Remove the country style ribs from the package and rinse them under cold water.
  • Pat them dry with a paper towel and lay them on the cutting board or in a large pan to contain the mess you’ll make by seasoning them ?

Step 2: Mustard and Rub

  • It’s pork.. very good pork, I might add and as most of you know, that calls for a nice sticky base of yellow mustard to help the rub to stick to the meat.
  • Go ahead and be generous.. it won’t taste like mustard and it won’t be yellow when it’s all said and done.
  • Rub it all over with you hands or if you’re squeamish, I suppose you could use a basting brush.
  • As long as the mustard is completely covering the meat, doesn’t matter how it gets there (within reason of course).
  • Sprinkle my Jeff's original rub (purchase recipes here) onto the meat and make sure you have full coverage on all sides.
  • I like to rub it in a little so it turns into a paste with the mustard.

Step 3: Onto the Bradley Rack (optional)

  • If you have Bradley racks like I do, lay them on the rack with just a slight bit of space between each one to allow the smoke to get in there a little bit. Cooling racks also work well.
  • I usually leave as much room as possible but I had other things to cook and so I had to give them a little less breathing room than usual.

Step 4: Get the Smoker Ready

  • Light up your smoker whether that means actually lighting the fire or just plugging it in and dialing in some settings. Do what it takes to get your smoker going at about 225°F.
  • Make sure the heat is indirect and use the water pan if your smoker has one.
  • I recommend a mix of mesquite and cherry wood for smoke if you can find it. If not, just use one of your other favorites that you have available.

Step 5: Smoke ’em Up

  • Once the smoker is ready, place the pork country style ribs directly on the grate or use the Bradley rack (described above) directly on the smoker grate.
  • Keep the heat at about 225°F if possible.
  • Keep the smoke going for at least 2 hours but longer is fine and even recommended as long as the smoke is nice and thin.
  • If you have a digital meat thermometer such as the Maverick ET-733 or the Maverick ET-735 (new bluetooth model), place the probe so that the end is about in the center of one of the ribs.
  • You can also use the super fast Thermapen to get a quick check on the temperature when you are adding wood or some other task that requires you to have the door open.
  • You can expect these ribs to take somewhere between 3-4 hours if you maintain 225-240°F but other factors do play a part such as:
  • Temperature of the meat when it goes into the smoker
  • How often you open the smoker door
  • How well you or the smoker maintains the set temperature
  • Wind, rain, ambient temperature, etc.
  • When the meat gets about 30 minutes away from being done, you can sauce them up if you want. I like sauce on these but they are also very good with just the dry rub.
  • Another option is to put them into a foil pan, covered with foil once they reach about 150-160°F to help them get done faster and to help them end up more tender.
  • They are done and tender at 180-185°F.

Step 6: Rest and Serve

  • You do not have to let these rest for a few minutes but in my opinion, about 10 minutes of rest time before serving does them good.

 

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