Barbecue and teriyaki is an excellent combination as demonstrated with this smoked pork sirloin roast marinated for several hours in teriyaki sauce and then rubbed with my original rub (Purchase formula here | Purchase bottled rub) and smoked to perfectly done.

Helpful Information
  • Preparation time: 15 minutes
  • Marinate Time: 4-8 hours
  • Cook time: 2 hours
  • Smoker temperature: 225-240°F
  • Meat finish temperature: 145°F
  • Recommended wood: Hickory
What You'll Need
IMG 7287 2000x1267Please note that my rubs and barbecue sauce are now available in 2 formats– you can purchase the formulas and make them yourself OR you can buy them already made, in a bottle, ready to use.

Step 1: Marinate

Remove the pork sirloin from it's packaging and give it a good rinse under cold water.

IMG 8321

Place the roast in a large zip top bag

IMG 8323

Pour enough teriyaki sauce over the meat to fully coat.

Press the air from the bag and zip it closed to create a vacuum and help the marinade to stay close to the meat.

IMG 8325

Put the bagged meat in the fridge for at least 4 hours or up to 8 hours if possible.

When the marinate time is over, remove the pork sirloin from the bag to season it.

IMG 8332

Do not rinse the marinade off.

Step 2: Season

I like to place the meat in a foil pan to contain the mess.

Coat the entire surface of the pork sirloin roast with my original rub (Purchase formula here | Purchase bottled rub).

IMG 8333

Be generous!

Leave the rubbed meat laying while you go get the smoker ready.

IMG 8335

Step 3: Get the Smoker Ready

Prepare the smoker for a 2 hour cook at about 225-240°F with enough smoking wood for at least 1 hour. I used Hickory this time but almost any smoking wood will work great.

You can even use a grill as long as you set it up for cooking indirect.

Note: to cook indirect on a typical 3 or 4 burner gas grill, only light one or two of the burners on one side. Place the meat on the opposite side over unlit burners. 

On a charcoal grill, place coals on both side of the grill and place a metal pan of water in the center between the coals. The meat goes directly over the water pan.

Smoke will come from wood chips wrapped in foil and placed over the coals or over the lit burners. Replace wood chips as needed to keep the smoke going for at least 1 hour.

Step 4: Smoke Cook the Pork Sirloin

Once the smoker or grill is ready, place the meat directly on the grate or you can use a Bradley rack for easy transport to and from the smoker.

Cook the meat at 225-240°F for about 2 hours or until it reaches an internal temperature of 145°F.

Note: For years now we were told to cook pork to 160°F to make sure it is safe. Back in 2011, the safe temperature was reduced to 145°F. I do understand that some folks do not deal well with change (yours truly) but if you can manage it, you will find that pork is so much better at this lower finished temperature. It ends up a lot more moist and flavorful due to it not being cooked to death.

For more teriyaki/bbq flavor, you can mix 2 parts teriyaki sauce with my barbecue sauce (Purchase formula here | Purchase bottled sauce) to make a uniquely delicious flavored sauce for this smoked pork sirloin. Apply the sauce a couple of times during the last 30 minutes in the smoker.

Step 5: Serve it Up

After removing the meat from the smoker, tent a piece of foil loosely over the meat and let it rest about 10 minutes before serving.

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After resting, slice it up and serve it immediately.

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Can you see how juicy and tender that is?!

IMG 8361

IMG 7287 2000x1267Please note that my rubs and barbecue sauce are now available in 2 formats– you can purchase the formulas and make them yourself OR you can buy them already made, in a bottle, ready to use.

Purchase the Formulas for Jeff’s Rubs and Sauce
**Instant Download!**
Jeff's Original Rub Recipe
Jeff's Barbecue Sauce
Jeff's Texas style rub recipe

I have hundreds and hundreds of smoking recipes in every imaginable category on this site and all of them are absolutely free. The only thing I offer for sale are the recipes to my (2) amazing dry rubs and my one-of-a-kind barbecue sauce.

Please understand that this is how I support the newsletter, the website and all of the other stuff that we do here to promote the art of smoking meat.

Read these recent testimonies:

I tried the rub on a beef brisket and some beef ribs the other day and our entire family enjoyed it tremendously. I also made a batch of the barbeque sauce that we used on the brisket as well as some chicken. We all agreed it was the best sauce we have had in a while.  –Darwyn B.

Thank you for the great advice. Followed your rib recipe and everyone loved them. Used your rub and sauce. On point!  –Charles W.

Love the sauce and rub recipes. So far I have used them on beef ribs, pork ribs, and different chicken parts. Can’t wait to do a beef brisket. Texas rub is great as well!  –Peter S.

You see the raving testimonies and you wonder, “Can the recipes really be that good?”

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Jeff’s Smoking Meat Books
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Smoking Meat: The Essential Guide to Real Barbecue – The book is full of recipes and contains tons of helpful information as well. Some have even said that “no smoker should be without this book”!

With more than 1000 reviews on Amazon.com and a rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars, it comes highly recommended and is a Bestseller in Barbecuing & Grilling books on Amazon.

AmazonBarnes & Noble | German Edition

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Smoke, Wood, Fire: The Advanced Guide to Smoking Meat – Unlike the first book, this book does not focus on recipes but rather uses every square inch of every page teaching you how to smoke meat. What my first book touched on, this second book takes it into much greater detail with lots of pictures.

It also includes a complete, step-by-step tutorial for making your own smoked “streaky” bacon using a 100 year old brine recipe.

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Printable Recipe

Teriyaki Barbecue Pork Sirloin

Barbecue and teriyaki is an excellent combination as demonstrated with this smoked pork sirloin roast marinated for several hours in teriyaki sauce and then rubbed with barbecue seasoning and smoked to perfectly done.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time2 hrs
Course: Entree
Cuisine: Hot Smoking
Servings: 4 -6
Author: Jeff Phillips

Ingredients

  • Pork sirloin roast ((s))
  • Bottled teriyaki sauce
  • Jeff’s original rub recipe
  • Jeff's barbecue sauce ((optional))

Instructions

Step 1: Marinate

  • Remove the pork sirloin from it's packaging and give it a good rinse under cold water.
  • Place the roast in a large zip top bag
  • Pour enough teriyaki sauce over the meat to fully coat.
  • Press the air from the bag and zip it closed to create a vacuum and help the marinade to stay close to the meat.
  • Put the bagged meat in the fridge for at least 4 hours and up to overnight or 8 hours.
  • When the marinate time is over, remove the pork sirloin from the bag to season it.
  • Do not rinse the marinade off.

Step 2: Season

  • I like to place the meat in a foil pan to contain the mess
  • Coat the entire surface of the pork sirloin roast with my original rub.
  • Be generous!
  • Leave the rubbed meat laying while you go get the smoker ready.

Step 3: Get the Smoker Ready

  • Prepare the smoker for a 2 hour cook at about 225-240°F with enough smoking wood for at least 1 hour.
  • You can also use a grill as long as you set it up for cooking indirect.
  • Note: to cook indirect on a typical 3 or 4 burner gas grill, only light one or two of the burners on one side. Place the meat on the opposite side over unlit burners.
  • On a charcoal grill, place coals on both side of the grill and place a metal pan of water in the center between the coals. The meat goes directly over the water pan.
  • Smoke will come from wood chips wrapped in foil and placed over the coals or over the lit burners. Replace wood chips as needed to keep the smoke going for at least 1 hour.

Step 4: Smoke Cook the Pork Sirloin

  • Once the smoker or grill is ready, place the meat directly on the grate or you can use a Bradley rack for easy transport to and from the smoker.
  • Cook the meat at 225-240°F for about 2 hours or until it reaches an internal temperature of 145°F.
  • Note: For years now we have been told to cook pork to 160°F to make sure it is safe. Recently, this safe temperature was reduced to 145°F. I do understand that some folks do not deal well with change (yours truly) but if you can manage it, you will find that pork is so much better at this lower finished temperature. It ends up a lot more moist and flavorful due to it not being cooked to death.
  • For more teriyaki flavor, you can mix 2 parts teriyaki sauce with my barbecue sauce to make a uniquely delicious flavored sauce for this smoked pork sirloin. Apply the sauce a couple of times during the last 30 minutes in the smoker.

Step 5: Serve it Up

  • After removing the meat from the smoker, tent a piece of foil loosely over the meat and let it rest about 10 minutes before serving.
  • After resting, slice it up and serve it immediately.