Stoker Review with Pulled Pork – March 3, 2011 Newsletter

Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on Twitter0Pin on Pinterest0Share on Google+0Email this to someonePrint this page
Print Friendly

Stoker Review with Pulled PorkI met Kenny at rocksbarbque.com via email about a year ago or so and when I let him know that I would like to do a review of his Stoker Power Draft System that I'd heard so much about, he promptly sent me an entire setup for my 22.5 Weber Smokey Mountain cooker.

In this month's article, I will not only tell you exactly how I went about setting it up and how well it worked, but I am going to show you the mouth watering pictures of the 20 hour smoked pork butt that I cooked with this thing all pulled and made into the most delicious pulled pork sandwich you have ever seen!

By the way..

Pulled Pork Sandwich with Jeff's Rub and SauceIn reviewing this Stoker Power Draft System, we opted to cook an 8-lb pork butt using my very own rib rub which just takes the pulled pork to a whole new level. We also used my sauce on the sandwiches and I am happy to say that as usual, the recipes did not let me down.. there was silence at the table for several minutes as everyone got caught up in the flavor and ambience that seems to surround anything I make with my rub and sauce.. almost magical!

Order the recipes for my rub and sauce and you'll see what I mean.. it's a small price for such a big wow;-)

Order Recipes | Read Testimonies

 

What's In this Edition

Last months Newsletter:

Apple Smoked Pork Chops

 


Join Me on Facebook and Twitter!

I'd love to have you follow me on Twitter or join me on Facebook. Here are a couple of links to make that happen:

Follow me on Twitter
Join me on Facebook (just hit the like button)


 

Stoker Power Draft System Review with Pulled Pork

More Info at RocksBarbque.com

What is the Stoker?

Stoker ModuleWell, I am just stoked that you asked (pun fully intended)! In laymen's terms, the Stoker is an electronic device or module connected to one or more fans and one or more temperature probes. The module uses it's built-in software to take the readings from the probe inside the smoker and automatically cycle the fan(s) on and off as needed to keep the smoker or pit at the set temperature. The fan blows air onto the coals and "stokes" the fire as needed to maintain the temperature that you dial in.

Another really awesome feature of the Stoker is that it can easily be connected to your home network which allows your smoker to be controlled and monitored via an online web page. Why is this important? Let's say you are cooking a pork butt for a bbq competition and you don't want to be sitting by the fire all night.. you'd like to get a little sleep as well. You can easily sit your laptop or internet enabled smart phone by the bed for you to be able to monitor the temperature of the pit and the meat at a glance. If anything happens to get out of hand, the smoker needs more fuel or the meat gets finished, the alarm(s) that you setup will go off and you can go check it out.

I will show you some screen shots later in this article that I took of this while smoke cooking the pork butt.

 

What's in the Box

I am sure that the setup for the Stoker varies somewhat depending on which smoker or cooker you have and how you will be using it but as you know, I am using it on a 22.5 Weber Smokey Mountain (WSM) so let's take a look at what came in the box and my initial procedures for making it work with my cooker.

Stoker Review - What Came in the Box

 

In the box..

  • Stoker module
  • Setup instructions
  • Owners manual
  • Fan
  • WSM Adapter
  • Hardware
  • Pit probe
  • Meat probe
  • Probe clip
  • A/C Adapter
  • A rack of ribs to practice with (ok, just kidding about this one;-)

Everything was packaged really well and the instruction sheet and owners manual were laid out in a very easy to understand format.

 

Installing the Fan to the Smoker

I wasted no time getting the fan attached to my smoker.. first the fan installation bolt/post must be attached to the bottom left hole in one of the bottom vents.

Next I used the (4) provided screws and washers to install the fan to the WSM adapter (I call it the bowl but I doubt if that is very technical) then installed the assembled unit over the bottom vent. Note the washer/wing nut in the bottom left side of the "bowl" that holds the fan to the vent. This makes it very quick and easy to remove and replace the fan as needed.

Fan Assy Installed to Smoker

 

Installing the Probe Access Grommet

I Removed one of the screws in the top of the smoker body that holds the top grate bracket and replaced it with the provided screw/grommet. This is to allow you to run the wires for the pit probe and the food probe into the smoker without interfering with the lid.

This is a quick and easy install as well and is very important since any air leaks in your lid will throw off the temperature sensors and cause spikes in your pit temperature.

Probe Grommett installed

 

Getting the Smoker Ready

Before we can use the Stoker and run it through some paces, we need to get the smoker ready with some charcoal and fill the water pan.

Empty charcoal chamber

 

Lump charcoal mounded up with 6-7 mesquite chunks buried down in the charcoal and a few cherry splits on top for extra flavor.

Charcoal mounded up with Cherry on top

 

Here are the Fire Starters I like to use when I'm not doing the minion method. They are just wax and hardwood sawdust made into bricks that are about 3 x 6 x 3/4.

Fire Starters

 

I break them into smaller pieces and scatter them over the charcoal for even lighting.

Light the Fire starters

 

Immediately set the smoker body onto the charcoal pan

Set the smoker body onto the charcoal chamber

 

Set the water pan on the water pan brackets, fill the water pan with about 1.5 – 2 gallons of warm to hot water and set the bottom grate on top.

Filled water pan and bottom grate installed

 

Set the top grate on the brackets at the top of the smoker body and route the pit probe through the grommet in the top side of the smoker body. Use the provided clamp to hold the pit probe just above the grate as shown. It is also a great idea to go ahead and route the meat probe through the grommet as well. I didn't do this at first and later wished I had!

Top grate installed and pit probe through grommet

 

Place the dome lid on the top of the smoker body

Lid on top of smoker body

 

Be sure that all of the bottom vents are closed fully and that the top vent in the lid is open only 25%. This goes against what the WSM manual says to do but trust me when I say that this is very important for proper operation of the Stoker. The fan pushes positive airflow into the smoker and creates a faster moving smoke through the smoker allowing the smaller vent opening to be more than adequate.

Top vent setting

 

Turn on the Stoker

Now the fun part.. make sure the fan and pit probe are plugged in securely to one of the device ports, plug the Stoker into an electrical outlet and turn on the stoker using the push switch in the back of the unit.

I had previously set the Stoker to maintain 220 degrees with my low alarm set to 210 and my high alarm set to 240. The lights on the plug side of the probe and fan came on for a few seconds indicating that it was running a self test and almost immediately I heard the fan kick on.

The fan is not super loud, just loud enough to let you know it is working as it should. I could also hear the metal flap/door on the fan being blown open by the fan and vibrating slightly. The cool thing is that this door closes automatically due to gravity just as soon as the fan goes off preventing temperature swings/spikes from air leakage.

The temperature continued to climb to my set temperature and the fan shut off just as soon as it reached 220 degrees.

I did notice that the pit temperature continued to climb to around 240 degrees even after the fan turned off. After talking to Kenny, it is obvious that I have air leaks in my smoker that need to be dealt with in order to fully give the Stoker control of my smoker temperature.

I gave the smoker an hour or so for the temperature to stabilize before adding any meat to the smoker.

 

Networking the Stoker

Stoker StatusI am not going to get into the small details of how to run this Stoker through your home network as that is not my forte.. I know enough to be dangerous but I certainly should not be instructing others on the subject.

The Stoker will work just fine as it is sitting right next to the smoker and will easily allow you to set the temperature that you want to maintain in your smoker as well as the low and high alarms that you want for your pit probe and your meat probe. If that is what you want to do, then it does that very well.

I ran a few tests on the Stoker that way but in writing this review I also wanted to be able to test the network capabilities as well. After talking to Kenny, I opted to simply use a wireless router connected to the Stoker without internet connected.

My house is about 150 feet from my lab and I was able to easily log onto the wireless router inside my home and ultimately to the Stoker control panel (explained in great detail on the website and in the manual).

If I understand it correctly, you could take this a lot further and connect the Stoker to an internet enabled router as well and be able to control and monitor the temperature in your smoker theoretically from anywhere in the world via your internet enabled smart phone or PC. I am just nerdy enough to think that is super cool and something I would love to try sometime.

 

My Thoughts on the Stoker 20 Hours Later

I went on to smoke a pork butt (recipe below) of about 8 lbs for around 20 hours using the Stoker and I have to say that I am super impressed with this unit. I am not comparing it to other similar power draft systems as I have not used other units but I can tell you that it would take a lot for another unit to impress me this much.

I guess you could say I am stoked about this thing! (I love saying that;-)

Sure I had some air leaks in my smoker that I need to fix but all in all the Stoker kept my temperature pretty much right on the money for around 12 hours. At this point, I may have jumped the gun when I didn't need to but I added more charcoal to the firebox.

The temperature dropped about 15 degrees and I assumed that the charcoal was getting close to the end of it's useful life. Come to find out, if I had ran my meat probe through the grommet instead of under the lid, I probably would have gotten several more hours out of the charcoal. The slightly raised lid produced a significant air leak and introduced a variable that should not have been there.

If I were looking for an electric or gas smoker due to ease of use and a set-it-and-forget-it way to smoke meat, I would certainly go with a Stoker paired with a charcoal smoker such as the WSM over an electric or gas smoker. The charcoal and wood will give you great flavor and a beautiful smoke ring that is second to none and the Stoker will give you the ease of use that you are looking for. Just makes perfect sense to me.

 

How to Get More Information on the Stoker

If you need more information or you want to order one of these units, find your way over to the Stoker website at https://www.rocksbarbque.com and be sure to tell them that you heard about this from Smoking-Meat.com. I don't make anything off of this but I do appreciate the expertise that has gone into making such a fine product and I don't mind promoting products that I feel are above and beyond.

 

Smoking a Pork Butt for Pulled Pork Sandwiches Using the Stoker

Note: Be sure to purchase my recipes for this.. it just isn't the same without them;-)

Smoked Pulled Pork SandwichWhile using that Stoker, I smoked up some of the best pulled pork I've ever made and I just had to write about it as well.. would seem like a shame to leave it untouched.

There are slight variations from region to region as to what goes on a pulled pork sandwich but what I have shown here is how I like to do it and you need to trust me when I say it is way too good for words!

 

What You'll Need

(1) Pork butt around 6-8 lbs note: may also be called a Boston butt

(1) Batch of Jeff's Rub

(1) Batch of Jeff's barbecue sauce

You can also use a pork picnic for this recipe but I think the flavor in the butt is superior to the picnic and I don't like fooling with the thick skin on the picnic. A butt is usually your best bet.

Look for plenty of fat marbling in the meat and deep red color to the meat.

 

How to Prepare the Pork Butt for Smoking

Remove the pork butt from the packaging and lay the it on a flat surface such as a cutting board or cookie sheet.

Pork butt out of package

 

We are going to add some rub to the outside of this pork butt for amazing flavor and you really want the rub to stick to the meat. To make this happen, use yellow mustard or even spray canola oil on the outside of the meat. I prefer the mustard personally.

Mustard squirted onto meat

Mustard applied all over meat

 

Once the mustard or other sticking agent is applied to the meat, make up a batch of my rib rub if you have the recipe (if not you might want to order it real quick) or you can use your own pork rub recipe if you have one that you really like. Pour or sprinkle on about 1/2 cup of the rub making sure to get it in all of the nooks and crannies of the pork butt. You can use more or less depending on how you like it.

Rub applied

 

The pork butt is now ready to cook.

 

Smoking the Pork Butt

Go out and get the smoker ready for cooking at about 220-225 degrees. The lower temperatures are to ensure that the rub does not burn but becomes a beautiful and tasty crust on the outside of the pork butt.

As we have stated above in the Stoker review, I opted to use mesquite and cherry for this one. Feel free to experiment with different woods to see what flavors of wood you like better. I tend to go for the more robust flavors but some folks prefer the milder flavors such as apple.

Note: keep the smoke going for at least 6 hours for best results. If you can do it, you'll get great results by keeping it going even longer. By burying the mesquite chunks in the charcoal, I had smoke going almost the entire cook time and it could not have been more delicious!

Place the pork butt directly on the grate in the center just over the water pan.

Insert the meat probe from the stoker into the pork butt making sure the wire is run through the grommet in the smoker body.

This allows you to leave the lid closed the entire time the pork butt is smoking except for adding water and a quick spritz with apple juice if that is your thing. For this experiment, I only opened the lid on the smoker twice to add water.

Pork Butt on Grate

 

To Foil or Not to Foil

Many folks will recommend that you wrap the pork butt in foil once it reaches about 160 degrees F. This is entirely up to you and partially depends on if you like the bark on the outside of the meat or not.

I love the flavor of the bark and the color variation that it adds to pulled pork so I usually opt to cook pork butt directly on the grates for the entire time. If you don't really care about the bark and want super moist and tender pork then feel free to wrap the pork butt in heavy duty foil once it reaches about 160 degrees F. Place it back on the grate wrapped and quickly close the lid.

 

Finishing up the Pork Butt

Foiled or not, continue to cook the pork butt until it reaches at least 200 degrees. Normally this will require about 1.5 to 2 hours per pound depending on how well you maintain the temperature. With the Stoker in charge of this cooking session, we maintained a very steady 220 to 230 throughout the entire smoke and the only reason it went up was because I told it to;-)

For some reason, this pork butt was one of those out of the ordinary pieces of meat that took a lot longer than normal.. it just happens sometimes at the low temperatures. It took 20 hours for the meat to reach 192 degrees and I finally had to call that good enough due to an appointment that could not be missed. I had planned on this being a 16 hour cook at worst case.

As it turns out, I barely got the pork butt off of the grate and into the house without it falling into pieces.

Pork Butt finished cooking

 

Pulled Pork Anyone?

This pork butt had a destiny called pulled pork sandwiches and this was probably some of the best I have ever eaten hands down. I slid the bone out of the meat.. that's right.. it just slid right out like hot butter!

I then stirred the meat around with a fork and it pretty much pulled itself. It fell into pieces and with very little effort I had pulled pork ready to be placed on a a bun.

Pulled and ready for sandwiches

 

Here is an a picture of the pulled pork sandwich that I made using french onion buns, pulled pork, my barbecue sauce, cole slaw and a side of salt and vinegar chips with a Kosher dill spear. Words cannot even describe the smile that I must have had on my face as I tasted of the smoky goodness on this plate.

Pulled Pork Sandwich with Chips

 


My Famous Recipes for Rub and Sauce

My recipes are something out of this world when it comes to flavor and turning something pretty good into something extremely amazing. I created these recipes more than 7 years ago and they are still the best thing out there. The WOW factor is off the charts! It still continues to amaze me when I taste my rub and sauce on things like turkey, ribs, brisket, pork shoulder.. you name it!

You will be amazed at the flavor that my rub recipe and sauce recipe imparts to pulled pork sandwiches.. it is nothing shy of amazing and not only in flavor, but also in the color and texture added by the rub and the sauce.

My recipes are well worth the price that I'm asking and when you are the star of the neighborhood, you can just smile and know that it was so worth it.

Here's a few testimonies that I have received recently from folks just like you who wondered if they should do it but are now so glad they did:

*********************************************

Jeff, All I can say is, WOW!!!!
I have been reading your news letters for over a year and I Just now purchased your rub recipe. I have used it on steak and chicken legs on the grill so far. Both times I have people say that it was the best steak or chicken they had ever had. I can't wait to smoke something with it. Great job, you are THE MAN!!!!

Chris

*********************************************

Jeff,I tried your rib rub recipe on some fresh pork ribs, It was a huge hit everyone loved it. This was my first time using a rub, the flavor was awesome. Although there wasn't much leftovers, it was even better the next day. Well worth the small price. I would recommend everyone to try it. The recipe is perfect, I won't change a thing. I look forward to try the bbq sauce next. Thank You!!!

Pete

*********************************************

I have to admit I was skeptical that the recipes were worth paying money for. But I haven't had a single complaint, in fact my woman says the baby back ribs are the best yet with your rub and sauce. Thanks for your web site. Keep it up!

Charles

*********************************************

I just wanted to let you know that I bought your recipes for your rub and your sauce about a year ago. I have now had the chance to use them on just about every kind of meat imaginable and wanted you to know they are FANTASTIC!!!! Money well spent!!!

James

*********************************************

I purchased your rub recipe and have delighted friends and family with its great flavor. When they ask me for the recipe, I tell them to go to your site and purchase. Something this awesome deserves compensation to the inventor!!! Thanks for all of the smoking tips!

Gary

*********************************************

It had been a while since I had fried chicken tenders for my family. I decided to throw in a couple of handfuls of your rib rub into the flour. I salted and peppered the chicken as usual, breaded the chicken in the flour/rib rub combo and then fried the chicken. My family thought it was delicious!

Kynda

*********************************************

Well! Thank you everyone!

You deserve the very best and it is completely within your grasp! Only $18.95 and worth every penny. Not only do you get the best rub and sauce recipe available, you are supporting this website and helping to make sure the bills get paid so we can keep on doing what we do to teach thousands and thousands of people across the world the art of smoking meat.

If you want to amaze your friends with something super special.. order the recipes today!! It's a small price to pay for such a big WOW!!

Order Recipes | Read Testimonies

Note:

My system is automated which means you should get a download email within MINUTES of ordering.. check your spam/junk folder first then contact me to get the recipes sent to you as an attachment.

 


Got Questions? We Have Answers!!

That's right.. if you have a question about smoking meat then look no further than our online community at SmokingMeatForums.com. With more than 25,000 members and literally hundreds of thousands of posts on every smoking meat subject known to man, you will certainly be in great hands.

What's more.. it's absolutely free and it's just a quick registration away. Once you've registered, don't forget to stop by the "Roll Call" area to introduce yourself and tell us a little about you, what smoker you are using (if any), what kind of work you do, and anything else you want to tell us.

We also have our very own one of a kind product review area, a buy/sell/trade area, a wiki system with lots of how-to information, personal photo galleries and so much more.

I personally look forward to seeing you there!

 


In Closing

Thank you for being a part of the smoking meat family which includes the newsletter, the forum, the smoking-meat.com website and many other resources that we try to provide to help you and countless others learn this great art.

A HUGE thank you to all of you who support the site by purchasing the recipes and other products that we sell.

Until next time.. keep smoking and God Bless.

Jeff Phillips

Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on Twitter0Pin on Pinterest0Share on Google+0Email this to someonePrint this page

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>