Smoked London Broil (Top Round)

This week we are talking about smoked London broil and, before anyone corrects me, I am fully aware that this is a cooking method rather than a cut of meat. However, this is how it will most likely be labeled in your meat section or behind the glass case so you'll know what to look for.

This cut is usually a beef top round and regardless of what you call it, smoking it is just what the doctor ordered!

If you want to get technical, we can call it a London smoke or just smoked top round if you prefer.

This recipe is very simple and if you are not careful, you might start thinking that nothing this easy could be so good but then you would be incorrect. This piece of meat does not need a lot to be great. A little oil, my original rub (purchase recipe here) and some time in the smoke and you will be very happy that you tried it.

Prep Time: 10 minutes | Cook Time: 1.5 – 2 hours | Smoker Temp: 225°F | Meat Finish Temp: 135-140°F | Recommended Wood: Oak or Pecan

What You'll Need
Prepare the London Broil for Smoking

Remove meat from packaging, rinse in cold water and place on a cutting board or in a foil pan to keep the cabinet nice and clean.

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Pour on a little olive oil.

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Rub/brush the olive oil all over the top and sides of the meat.

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Sprinkle some of my original rub (purchase recipe here) on the outside of the meat.

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Flip the meat over and repeat with the oil and my original rub (purchase recipe here) on the bottom side.

Smoking the London Broil

Regardless of whether you are using an electric, charcoal, gas, or wood smoker, prepare it for smoke cooking at about 225 degrees. 215 to 225 is best to give it plenty of time in the smoke before it reaches its done temperature.

Once the smoker is pre-heated and ready, place the meat on a bradley rack, Weber grill pan, a cooling rack or you can place it directly on the smoker grate.

Smoke cook the meat for about 90 minutes or until it reaches your desired level of doneness. You will need to test the temperature using a meat thermometer and if you want the very best, then consider purchasing a super fast Thermapen which reads the temperature for me in less than a second. Of course, I have the black model and I am convinced it is the fastest one;-)

If you want a great digital probe meat thermometer that stays in the meat while it cooks, then you need the “Smoke” by Thermoworks which keeps you apprised of your smoker temperature as well as your meat temperature via dual probes and a remote unit that you can carry with you up to 300 feet away.

The London broil that I purchased was only about 1.5 lbs so it got to a good medium rare (135°F) in just over an hour.

I threw it in a hot iron skillet with just a little oil for a minute or two per side to give it a good reverse sear. You could also do this on a hot grill or even under the broiler.

The iron skillet works really fat but if you choose to use the grill or broiler method, you might consider removing the meat when it is about 120-125°F and let the heat from the grill or broiler bring it up to 135-140°F.

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Reverse Sear: This term is used a lot when smoking meat and is simply searing the meat after it is cooked rather than before per the traditional method.

Let the meat rest under foil for a few minutes before slicing.

Slice it thin on the diagonal and across the grain.

Serve with grilled peppers and onion or a nice garden salad for great results!

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You can also order the formulas for my rubs and sauce and make these yourself at home. Grab those HERE and download immediately.

Jeff’s Smoking Meat Books

smoking-meat-book-coverSmoking Meat: The Essential Guide to Real Barbecue – The book is full of recipes and contains tons of helpful information as well. Some have even said that “no smoker should be without this book”!

With more than 1000 reviews on Amazon.com and a rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars, it comes highly recommended and is a Bestseller in Barbecuing & Grilling books on Amazon.

AmazonBarnes & Noble | German Edition

smoke-wood-fire-book-coverSmoke, Wood, Fire: The Advanced Guide to Smoking Meat – Unlike the first book, this book does not focus on recipes but rather uses every square inch of every page teaching you how to smoke meat. What my first book touched on, this second book takes it into much greater detail with lots of pictures.

It also includes a complete, step-by-step tutorial for making your own smoked “streaky” bacon using a 100 year old brine recipe.

Purchase at Amazon

12 Comments

  1. Lolita April 30, 2022 at 8:29 am - Reply

    I am hoping to make this London broil tomorrow, but my hubby and I can’t agree on if the meat stays in the foil pan in the smoker. Can you please clarify for us smoker newbies? Thanks so much for all the awesome recipes!

  2. Phillip Cooper July 31, 2020 at 12:40 pm - Reply

    Decent article, but I'm not sure you have enough links to things to buy, or hawking your rub recipe.

    • Mark January 12, 2021 at 4:22 pm - Reply

      Philip
      It’s a business he has to pay the bills.
      I love this site there are recipes for about any cut of meat you may want to smoke.
      Thanks Jeff!!

  3. Dave June 12, 2020 at 2:44 pm - Reply

    I thinking about trying this recipe with some 1 1/2 ” thick NY strip steaks. Any reason you think why that would be a bad idea? Thanks!

  4. Joseph Loftus April 21, 2019 at 9:09 am - Reply

    I made this and the smoked scallops for dinner last night – SUPERB!! used the Texas rub on both with applewood. Used my 48″ gas grill and it worked out fine. the thinner (flat) london broils came out nearer medium, but juicy and tasty nonetheless. can't wait for my next smoke!

  5. Charlie February 3, 2019 at 7:34 pm - Reply

    Yes you can call this smoked London broil I used top round marinated just like London broil (sorry used my own marinade been making my own for years) just added the smoking step before I finished the meat could have broiled it or thrown it on the barbecue but I took your advice and seared it in a cast iron skillet excellent advice really sealed in the juices and flavor

  6. Scott Wolpert September 7, 2013 at 5:03 pm - Reply

    Hi Jeff. 

    I just finished making your Smoked London Broil and it was AMAZING!!! My kids had thirds and fourth!  This is a keeper, thanks.

    Scott

  7. Lee June 6, 2013 at 4:53 pm - Reply

    My wife is on no salt diet. Do you know a recipe for a rub with lots of flavor that is salt free since I can't brine.

  8. Rod Gossling June 4, 2013 at 8:46 pm - Reply

    Hi,

    I purchased your rub and sauce recipes about a month ago, They are very good and I'm glad I bought them. But I am still getting the ads in my newsletter. Aren't they supposed to stop after I purchased the recipes? Just wondering.

    Thanks, Rod

     

     

     

    • Jeff Phillips June 5, 2013 at 3:52 pm - Reply

      Rod, I just checked and you are subscribed to the customer list which means you should no longer be getting ads in your email newsletter. If you see ads in the newsletter that goes out tomorrow, please forward it to me so I can investigate further. Thank you!

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