Smoked Chicken Quarters with Beer BBQ Sauce Glaze

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Hello friends and welcome to this edition of the smoking meat newsletter. One of the things I really enjoy doing on the smoker are smoked chicken quarters and I have to say that I find myself doing these fairly often and especially if my wife has any say-so in the menu.

It just so happens that they are quick, easy, and very tasty and I am happy to show you my fool proof method for making these turn out great every time.

I highly recommend brining these as I do with most poultry and I will, of course, walk you through that process in the article below.

These were no ordinary chicken quarters though and with this batch, I decided to try something a little different in getting the rub up under the skin and it worked like a charm.

I also used my own sauce recipe to make a beer barbecue glaze which I applied a couple of times during the smoking/cooking process and it was a winner as well.

If you did not get the previous newsletter on smoking a stuffed salmon, you can read it HERE.

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Smoked Chicken Quarters

Brine Time: 2 hours | Prep Time: 20 minutes | Cook Time: 2.5 hours | Smoker Temp: 225 F – 240 F | Meat Finish Temp: 165 F | Recommended Wood: Pecan or Cherry

What You’ll Need

  • 10 lbs of chicken quarters, about 13 pieces
  • 1/3 can of beer (the cheap stuff is fine)
  • Jeff’s Rub (purchase recipe here)
  • 1/2 stick butter (4 TBS)
  • Brine (recipe below)
  • Jeff’s barbecue sauce recipe (purchase recipe here)
  • Turkey baster
  • Foil pan (optional but keeps the work area a lot cleaner)

​​Chicken quarters

I highly recommend brining the chicken pieces and while you don’t have to do this, it will make the chicken more juicy and it adds some flavor to the chicken meat itself.

If you choose to brine, here’s how to do it. Otherwise, skip on down to the preparation instructions below.

How to Brine the Chicken Quarters

  1. Mix up your brine following the basic recipe below.
  2. Place the chicken in a large Ziploc bag or a lidded plastic or glass container.
  3. Pour the brine over the chicken and place it in the fridge for 2 hours.
  4. Once it’s done brining, rinse the chicken really good under cold water.

Basic Brine Recipe

  • 1 gallon water
  • 1 cup of kosher salt
  • 3/4 cup of brown sugar (dark brown is best but light will work)

I like to use the basic recipe but if you want to add fruit juice, beer, wine, hot sauce, Zesty Italian dressing to the mix you can certainly do that. One of the really nice thing about brines are that whatever you put into the brine, will end up inside the meat.

Using a 1 gallon pitcher, pour kosher salt into water and stir until it is dissolved and water returns to clear. Then add brown sugar and stir until dissolved.

Read more about brining HERE

Preparing the Chicken Quarters for Smoking

Once the chicken is done brining you will, of course, want to add some seasoning to it, and my rub recipe is just the ticket.

Mix my rub with melted butter using the recipe below:

I ran the rub through a coffee grinder to make it more smooth but you do not have to do that. It’s nice but not entirely necessary. The turkey baster has a nice large opening and will suck up the rub/butter mixture just like it is.

Use the microwave to heat the butter for about 30 seconds before adding the rub.

Using a turkey baster

Once you have some mixture in the baster, inject a little under the skin of each chicken quarter at the leg section and at the thigh section.

Injecting rub/butter under the skin

Once all of the chicken quarters are injected with the rub/butter mixture, they are ready to smoke.

Injected wth rub/butter mixture

Prepare the smoker to cook at about 240 degrees

These can be smoke cooked on any smoker whether it is electric, gas, charcoal or wood. If you need more information on various smokers, please see my smoker instructions page where you can find instructions for several different smokers. Even if they are not exactly what you have, you can garner some good information from reading them.

Once the smoker is perking along at your goal temperature and ready to go, place the chicken quarters directly on the smoker grate with about 1 inch between each piece so the smoke can have good access to the meat.

You can expect these to take about 2.5 to 3 hours under normal circumstances and I recommend keeping them in the smoke the entire time if you are using something other than wood fired smoker.

Beer Barbecue Sauce Glaze

Here’s the fun part!

Make up a batch of my sauce (purchase the recipe here if you don’t have it) then mix about 1 cup of sauce to 1/2 cup of beer to thin down the sauce and make a sort of glaze out of it. You can make it as thin as you like by altering the amount of beer that you add.

My sauce is naturally pretty thick and it works well just like it is if you want sticky chicken quarters but the idea for these is to just glaze them a little throughout the process.

Apply the sauce/glaze when the chicken reaches about 135 degrees then again at about 150 degrees internal.

Finishing the Smoked Chicken Quarters

You can let them continue to smoke cook at 240 degrees if you like but I like to turn up the heat to about 265 if possible when the chicken reaches about 150 degrees internal.

This increase in heat will help to crisp up the skin and puts a nice finish on the glazed skin. It also helps it to get done a little faster and chicken can always handle high heat just fine.

The only reason for cooking these slow is to give them ample time in the smoke.

Use an instant read digital thermometer such as the Thermapen or use a digital probe meat thermometer that stays in the chicken while it cooks such as the Maverick ET-732 to monitor the temperature of the chicken. It is done when it reaches 165 degrees in the thickest part of the leg or thigh.

Let them rest for about 10 minutes after they finish and before serving them.

Voila!

Finished Smoked Chicken Quarters

 

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Read these recent testimonies:

Love the sauce and rub  07/31/14
Full StarFull StarFull StarFull StarFull Star
Love the sauce and rub recipes. So far I have used them on beef ribs, pork ribs, and different chicken parts. Can’t wait to do a beef brisket.
Texas rub is great as well! ~Peter S.
I tried the rub on a beef  08/15/14
Full StarFull StarFull StarFull StarFull Star
..I tried the rub on a beef brisket and some beef ribs the other day and our entire family enjoyed it tremendously. I also made a batch of the barbeque sauce that we used on the brisket as well as some chicken. We all agreed it was the best sauce we have had in a while. ~Darwyn B.
Love the original rib rub  07/31/14
Full StarFull StarFull StarFull StarFull Star
 Love the original rib rub and sauce! We have an annual rib fest competition at the lake every 4th of July. I will say we have won a great percent of the time over the past 15 years so we are not novices by any means. However, we didn’t win last year and had to step up our game! We used Jeff’s rub and sauce (sauce on the side) and it was a landslide win for us this year! Thanks Jeff for the great recipes. I’m looking forward to trying the Texas style rub in the near future! ~Michelle M.

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The Ultimate Barbecue Magazine: StoryQue

I write for this digital magazine and I consider myself a friend to the guy who publishes it but that is not the reason I like it so much. It is packed full of great articles, recipes, stories, pictures that will make you drool and so much more. If you are the least bit interested in any form of outdoor cooking, you will absolutely be crazy about this magazine.

You should check it out if you get a chance!


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Comments

  1. Ronald Hoffbauer says

    Jeff

    Have you tried using a cajun injector instead of a baster to get the mixture under the skin?

    • says

      I have not tried the Cajun injector for anything other than injecting the meat. The nice thing about the baster is that you can have larger pieces of coarse pepper, minced garlic, etc. without it getting stuck. The injector requires that everything be ground very fine so that it does not get caught in the small holes.

  2. Kent says

    I’m trying this for Super Bowl Sunday tomorrow. Instead of injecting under the skin, I’m going to inject into the meat like I do turkey. (I have a heavy-duty injector) I’ll run the rub through a sifter before mixing with the butter and beer. Beef Sausage, bacon wrapped shrimp and stuffed jalapenos at the same time. Can’t wait!!

  3. clete schultz says

    Jeff, For the chicken hind quarters do you cover the outside with your dry rub as well as injecting them with a wet rub. Really enjoy you newa letters. I have learned a lot as a result of them.  thanks clete

    • Todd says

      how'd they turn out? Going to try it tonight.

      Doesn't look like any rub was added to the outside but I'm going to sprinkle only a bit on mine.

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